Euclid

Euclid

Euclid is a mission for the European Space Agency (ESA) Cosmic Vision (CV) 2015-25 programme to explore how the Universe evolved over the past 10 billion years to address questions related to fundamental physics and cosmology on the nature and properties of dark energy, dark matter and gravity, as well as on the physics of the early universe and the initial conditions which seed the formation of cosmic structure.

The satellite is expected to be launched in the first quarter of 2020 by a Soyuz ST-2.1B rocket and then travel to the L2 Sun-Earth Lagrangian point for a six years mission. To accomplish its goals, Euclid will carry out a wide survey of 15,000 deg2 of the sky free of contamination by light from the Milky Way and the Solar System and a 40 deg2 deep survey to measure the high-redshift universe. The complete survey represents hundreds of thousands of ima- ges and several tens of Petabytes of data.

Euclid will observe about 10 billion sources out of which more than one billion will be used for weak lensing. Several tens of million galaxy redshifts will be also measured and used for galaxy clustering. With the- se images Euclid will probe the expansion history of the Universe an the evolution of cosmic struc- tures by measuring the modification of shapes of galaxies induced by gravitational lensing effects of dark matter and the 3-dimension distribution of structures from spectroscopic redshifts of galaxies and clusters of galaxies.

 

 

 

ATLAS investigates a broad range of physics, including the search for the Higgs boson, extra dimensions, and new particles that could make up dark matter.

It will be an advanced facility for ground based very- high-energy gamma ray astronomy, based on the observation of Cerenkov radiation.

The main goal of the project is to survey 5000 sq. deg. of the southern galactic sky, measuring positions on the sky, shapes and redshifts of about 300 million galaxies and 15000 galaxy clusters.

Euclid is a mission for the European Space Agency (ESA) Cosmic Vision (CV) 2015-25 programme to probe the expansion history of the Universe by carrying out a wide survey of galaxies in 15,000 sq. deg. of the sky. It will be launched in the first quarter of 2020 and the mission will last 6 years.

It is a new generation two-telescope system located at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory at the La Palma Canary Island.

Solid state pixel detector are used in many detectors in the field of High Energy Physics and the aim of our research line is mold this existing technology into a useful form to service the interest of the public.

The contributions of the IFAE group to the T2K experiment focus on the near detector, specifically in the construction of the time projection chamber and the refurbishing of the old magnet.

PAU is a project with the objective of constructing a large CCD camera for the WHT in La Palma, equipped with many narrow band filters as to be able to provide accurate photometric redshifts for a high density galaxy sample. In a second phase the PAUCam Team will conduct a large survey with this instrument/telescope to study the accelerated expansion of the universe.

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