NOVEMBER 2014 - Black Hole Gamma-Ray Lightning

 

Black Hole Gamma-Ray Lightning

(Versió en català al final)

(Versión en español al final)

The MAGIC telescopes at La Palma have recorded the fastest gamma-ray flares seen to date, produced in the vicinity of a super-massive black hole. The scientists explain this phenomenon by a mechanism similar to that producing lightning in a storm. This result, with an important Spanish contribution, is published today in Science.

 In the night from 12 to 13 November 2012, the MAGIC gamma-ray telescopes, in the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, were observing the Perseus cluster of galaxies (at a distance of about 260 million light-years) when they detected this extraordinary phenomenon coming from one of the galaxies in the cluster, known as IC310. As many other galaxies, IC310 hosts in its center a super-massive black hole of several million times the mass of the Sun, which sporadically produces intense gamma-ray flares. On this occasion, however, the scientists were astonished by the brevity of the flares, lasting only for a few minutes.

“Relativity tells us that no object can emit for a time shorter than it takes light to cross it. We know that the black hole in IC310 has a size of about 20 light-minutes, approximately three times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. This means that the black hole cannot produce a flare shorter than 20 minutes”, says Julian Sitarek, a Juan de la Cierva researcher at IFAE (Barcelona), and one of the three leading scientists of this work. However, the flares observed in IC310 lasted for less than 5 minutes.

The scientists of the MAGIC Collaboration propose a new mechanism, according to which this “gamma-ray storm” is produced in the vacuum regions created close to the black hole magnetic poles. Very intense electric fields appear in these regions, and are destroyed when they are filled again with charged particles. These particles are accelerated up to close the speed of light, subsequently transferring part of their energy to the photons they find in their way, thus converting them into gamma rays. The time needed for the light to cross one of these vacuum regions is of a few minutes, in agreement with the observations of IC310. “It is similar to what happens in an electric storm”, explains Oscar Blanch, Ramón y Cajal researcher at IFAE, and Co-Spokesman of the MAGIC Collaboration. “The potential difference is so large that it ends up discharging into a lightning”. In this case, the discharge reaches the highest energies observed in nature, and produces gamma rays. The black hole appears to be immersed in a storm of colossal proportions.

Up until now, the gamma ray emissions from galaxies such as IC310 were believed to originate in the particle jets produced by the black holes. These jets are detected in many galaxies, and they expand for hundreds of thousands light-years. When a jet points directly towards the Earth, a relativistic effect, called “apparent superluminous motion”, is produced, due to the similar speeds at which the emitter (jet particles) and the emission (the gamma rays) travel toward us. As a result, the measured intensity of the gamma-ray emission is higher, and its variability faster. However, this explication does not apply to the case of IC310, as its jets do not point at us. The gamma rays must be created practically on the black hole itself.

MAGIC is the present of a young yet fruitful field of science known as Ground-based Gamma-ray Astronomy. Its first steps at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias trace back to the 1980s, with the HEGRA telescopes. The imminent future of the field is the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), to be formed of about 100 telescopes at two observatories (in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres). The Spanish groups of the MAGIC Collaboration have presented a candidacy to build the CTA-North observatory at Roque de los Muchachos or at Teide. This is the best opportunity for Spain to host one of the major global scientific installations that will mark the progress of Astronomy in the years to come.

MAGIC consists of two, 17-m diameter reflective telescopes, built and operated by an international collaboration of 160 scientists from Spain, Germany, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, Finland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Japan and India. MAGIC is celebrating its tenth anniversary with its fifth scientific publication in Science Magazine. Major contributions of the Spanish groups to the construction of MAGIC include the original camera of one of the telescopes, most of the electronics and the data center. The success of the experiment has been possible thanks to the quality of the sky at La Palma. The Spanish institutes participating in the experiment are: Instituto de Física de Altas Energías (IFAE, Barcelona), Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Universidad de Barcelona, Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC, Barcelona), Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, La Laguna), Universidad Complutense de Madrid and Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioabmientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT, Madrid). 

 

Further information on MAGIC: https://wwwmagic.mpp.mpg.de/

Contacts:

Dr. Javier Rico

Instituto de Física de Altas Energías

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 164 1661

 

Prof. Lluis Font                  

Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 2935

 

Prof. Josep Maria Paredes

Universidad de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 402 1130

 

Dra. Emma de Oña-Wilhelmi

Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC)

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 4364

 

Prof. Ramón García López

Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 922 605 209

 

Prof. Maria Victoria Fonsenca

Universidad Complutense de Madrid

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 394 4491

 

Dr. Carlos Delgado

Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 496 25 83

 

 magic news

THE MAGIC TELESCOPES AT THE OBSERVATORIO DEL ROQUE DE LOS MUCHACHOS, IN LA PALMA (full-resolution picture available at: https://magicold.mpp.mpg.de/gallery/pictures/IMG_2520.JPG)

Credit: The MAGIC Collaboration

 

 

Tempesta de raigs gamma en el forat negre 

Els telescopis MAGIC de la Palma han registrat les flamarades de raigs gamma més ràpides vistes fins ara, produïdes en les rodalies d'un forat negre supermassiu. Els científics expliquen aquest fenomen mitjançant un mecanisme similar al que produeix els llampecs en una tempesta. Aquest resultat, amb una important participació espanyola, apareix publicat avui a la revista Science.

La nit del 12 al 13 de Novembre de 2012 els telescopis MAGIC de raigs gamma, a l'Observatori del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Illes Canàries), es trobaven observant el cúmul de galàxies de Perseu (situat a una distància d'uns 260 milions d'anys-llum), quan van detectar aquest fenomen insòlit provinent d'una de les galàxies del cúmul, coneguda com a IC310. Igual que moltes altres galàxies, IC310 alberga en el seu centre un forat negre supermassiu (diversos centenars de milions de vegades més pesat que el Sol) el qual, de forma esporàdica, produeix intenses flamarades de raigs gamma. El que va sorprendre els científics en aquesta ocasió va ser l'extrema brevetat d'aquestes flamarades, amb una durada de tan sols uns pocs minuts.

"La Relativitat ens diu que cap objecte pot emetre llum durant un temps menor al que la llum triga en travessar-lo. Sabem que el forat negre a la galàxia IC310 té una mida d'uns 20 minuts-llum, al voltant de tres vegades la distància entre el Sol i la Terra. Això vol dir que cap fenomen produït per aquest objecte hauria de durar menys de 20 minuts", ens explica Julian Sitarek, investigador Juan de la Cierva a l'IFAE (Barcelona), i un dels tres científics que han liderat l'estudi. No obstant això, les flamarades que es van observar a IC310 duraven menys de 5 minuts.

Els científics de la col·laboració MAGIC proposen un nou mecanisme, segons el qual aquesta "tempesta de raigs gamma" es produeix en les regions de buit que es formen prop dels pols magnètics del forat negre. En aquestes zones buides es creen momentàniament camps elèctrics molt intensos, que són destruïts quan la zona és ocupada de nou per partícules carregades. Aquestes partícules s'acceleren a velocitats molt properes a la de la llum i transformen en raigs gamma els fotons que troben en el seu camí en transferir part de la seva energia. El temps que triga la llum per recórrer una d'aquestes zones buides és de pocs minuts, la qual cosa que encaixa amb el fenòmen observat al forat negre d’IC310. "És similar al que passa en les tempestes elèctriques", explica Oscar Blanch, investigador Ramón i Cajal de l'IFAE, i codirector de la Col·laboració MAGIC. "Es crea una diferència de potencial tan forta que acaba per descarregar-se com un llampec". En aquest cas, la descàrrega arriba a tenir les energies més altes observades en la natura i produeix raigs gamma. El forat negre sembla estar embolicat en una tempesta de dimensions estel·lars.

Fins ara, es pensava que l'emissió gamma de galàxies com IC310 es generava en els dolls de partícules que produeix el forat negre. Aquests dolls es detecten en moltes galàxies, i s'estenen centenars de milers d'anys llum. Quan un dels raigs apunta directament cap a la Terra, es produeix un efecte relativista conegut com "Moviment superlumínic aparent", pel fet que l'emissor (les partícules del raig) i l'emissió (els raigs gamma) viatgen cap a nosaltres a una velocitat semblant . Com a resultat, la intensitat de l'emissió gamma que es mesura és més gran, i la seva variabilitat més ràpida. Però aquesta explicació no és vàlida en el cas d’IC310, perquè els seus raigs no apunten cap a nosaltres. Segurament els raigs gamma vénen des de molt més endins: pràcticament des del mateix forat negre.

MAGIC és el present d'una jove però fructífera branca de la ciència: l'Astronomia de raigs gamma des de terra. La seva exitosa presència a l'Observatori del Roque de los Muchachos de l'Institut d'Astrofísica de les Canàries es remunta als anys 80, amb els telescopis HEGRA. El futur immediat del camp el representa el Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), que estarà format per uns 100 telescopis distribuïts en dos observatoris (en els hemisferis Nord i Sud). Els grups espanyols de MAGIC han presentat una candidatura per construir l'observatori CTA-Nord al Roque de los Muchachos o al Teide. Aquesta possibilitat representa una de les millors oportunitats per allotjar a Espanya una de les grans instal·lacions científiques globals que marcaran el desenvolupament de l'Astronomia en els propers anys.

MAGIC està composat per dos telescopis amb reflectors de 17 m de diàmetre, construïts i operats per una col·laboració internacional formada per 160 científics d'Espanya, Alemanya, Itàlia, Polònia, Suïssa, Finlàndia, Bulgària, Croàcia, Japó i l'Índia. Celebra ara el seu desè aniversari amb la publicació del seu cinquè treball científic a la revista Science. Les majors contribucions espanyoles a la construcció de MAGIC han estat la càmera original d'un dels telescopis, gran part de l'electrònica i el centre de dades. La qualitat del cel de la Palma ha contribuït decisivament al seu èxit. Les institucions espanyoles participants són l'Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE, Barcelona), la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, la Universitat de Barcelona, l'Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC, Barcelona), l'Institut d'Astrofísica de les Canàries (IAC, la Llacuna), la Universitat Complutense de Madrid i el Centre d'Investigacions Energètiques, Mediambientals i Tecnològiques (CIEMAT, Madrid).

 

 Més informació sobre MAGIC: https://wwwmagic.mpp.mpg.de/

Contactes:

Dr. Javier Rico

Instituto de Física de Altas Energías

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 164 1661

 

Prof. Lluis Font        

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 2935

 

Prof. Josep Maria Paredes

Universidad de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 402 1130

 

Dra. Emma de Oña-Wilhelmi

Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC)

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 4364

 

Prof. Ramón García López

Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 922 605 209

 

Prof. Maria Victoria Fonsenca

Universidad Complutense de Madrid

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 394 4491

 

Dr. Carlos Delgado

Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 496 25 83

 

 

Tormenta de rayos gamma en el agujero negro

 

Los telescopios MAGIC de La Palma han registrado las llamaradas de rayos gamma más rápidas vistas hasta la fecha, producidas en las cercanías de un agujero negro supermasivo. Los científicos explican este fenómeno mediante un mecanismo similar al que produce los relámpagos en una tormenta. Este resultado, con una importante participación española, aparece publicado hoy en la revista Science.

En la noche del 12 al 13 de Noviembre de 2012 los telescopios MAGIC de rayos gamma, en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, se encontraban observando el cúmulo de galaxias de Perseo (situado a una distancia de unos 260 millones de años-luz), cuando detectaron este fenómeno insólito proveniente de una de las galaxias del cúmulo, conocida como IC310. Al igual que muchas otras galaxias, IC310 alberga en su centro un agujero negro supermasivo (varios cientos de millones de veces más pesado que el Sol) el cual, de forma esporádica, produce intensas llamaradas de rayos gamma. Lo que sorprendió a los científicos en esta ocasión fue la extrema brevedad de dichas llamaradas, con una duración de tan solo unos pocos minutos.

“La Relatividad nos dice que ningún objeto puede emitir durante un tiempo menor al que le lleva a la luz atravesarlo. Sabemos que el agujero negro en IC310 tiene un tamaño de unos 20 minutos-luz, alrededor de tres veces la distancia entre el Sol y la Tierra. Esto quiere decir que ningún fenómeno producido por el mismo debería durar menos de 20 minutos”, nos cuenta Julian Sitarek, investigador Juan de la Cierva en el IFAE (Barcelona), y uno de los tres científicos que han liderado el estudio. Sin embargo las llamaradas que se observaron en IC310 duraban menos de 5 minutos.

Los científicos de la Colaboración MAGIC proponen un nuevo mecanismo, según el cual esta “tormenta de rayos gamma” se produce en las regiones de vacío que se forman cerca de los polos magnéticos del agujero negro. En estas zonas vacías se crean momentáneamente campos eléctricos muy intensos, que son destruidos cuando la zona es ocupada de nuevo por partículas cargadas. Dichas partículas se aceleran a velocidades muy próximas a la de la luz y transforman en rayos gamma los fotones que encuentran en su camino al transferirles parte de su energía. El tiempo que tarda la luz en recorrer una de estas zonas vacías es de pocos minutos, lo que encaja con lo observado en IC310. “Es similar a lo que ocurre en las tormentas eléctricas”, explica Oscar Blanch, investigador Ramón y Cajal del IFAE, y Co-Director de la Colaboración MAGIC. “Se crea una diferencia de potencial tan fuerte que acaba por descargarse como un relámpago”. En este caso, la descarga alcanza las energías más altas observadas en la naturaleza y produce rayos gamma. El agujero negro parece estar envuelto en una tormenta de dimensiones estelares.

Hasta ahora, se pensaba que la emisión gamma de galaxias como IC310 se generaba en los chorros de partículas que produce el agujero negro. Estos chorros se detectan en muchas galaxias, y se extienden cientos de miles de años luz. Cuando uno de los chorros apunta directamente hacia la Tierra, se produce un efecto relativista conocido como “movimiento superlumínico aparente”, debido a que el emisor (las partículas del chorro) y la emisión (los rayos gamma) viajan hacia nosotros a una velocidad parecida. Como resultado, la intensidad de la emisión gamma que se mide es mayor, y su variabilidad más rápida. Pero esta explicación no es válida en el caso de IC310, porque sus chorros no apuntan hacia nosotros. Seguramente los rayos gamma vienen desde mucho más abajo: prácticamente del propio agujero negro.

MAGIC es el presente de una joven pero fructífera rama de la ciencia: la Astronomía de Rayos Gamma desde tierra. Su exitosa presencia en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos del Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias se remonta a los años 80, con los telescopios HEGRA. El futuro inmediato del campo lo representa el Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), que estará formado por unos 100 telescopios distribuidos en dos observatorios (en los hemisferios Norte y Sur). Los grupos españoles de MAGIC han presentado una candidatura para construir el observatorio CTA-Norte en el Roque de los Muchachos o el Teide. Esta posibilidad representa una de las mejores oportunidades para albergar en España una de las grandes instalaciones científicas globales que marcarán el desarrollo de la Astronomía en los próximos años.

MAGIC está compuesto por dos telescopios con reflectores de 17 m de diámetro, construidos y operados por una colaboración internacional formada por 160 científicos de España, Alemania, Italia, Polonia, Suiza, Finlandia, Bulgaria, Croacia, Japón e India. Celebra ahora su décimo cumpleaños con la publicación de su quinto trabajo científico en la revista Science. Las mayores contribuciones españolas a la construcción de MAGIC han sido la cámara original de uno de los telescopios, gran parte de la electrónica y el centro de datos. La calidad del cielo de La Palma ha contribuido decisivamente a su éxito. Las instituciones españolas participantes son el Instituto de Física de Altas Energías (IFAE, Barcelona), la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, la Universidad de Barcelona, el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC, Barcelona), el Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, La Laguna), la Universidad Complutense de Madrid y el Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT, Madrid).

 

Más información sobre MAGIC: https://wwwmagic.mpp.mpg.de/

Contactos:

Dr. Javier Rico

Instituto de Física de Altas Energías

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 164 1661

 

Prof. Lluis Font                  

Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 2935

 

Prof. Josep Maria Paredes

Universidad de Barcelona

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 402 1130

 

Dra. Emma de Oña-Wilhelmi

Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC)

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 93 581 4364

 

Prof. Ramón García López

Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 922 605 209

 

Prof. Maria Victoria Fonsenca

Universidad Complutense de Madrid

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 394 4491

 

Dr. Carlos Delgado

Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tel: 91 496 25 83

 

 

We use own and third-party cookies to improve our services by analyzing your browsing habits. If you continue browsing, we will consider that you allow us to use them. You can change the settings or get more information on our "Cookies policy".

I accept cookies from this site.